Starting a Crochet Braids Business

September 22, 2016

Crochet Braids by Twana was founded in 2011. But it was not something I set out to do. It was never my goal to do hair professionally.  I needed supplemental income and the demand was there.  More than 5 years later, it has become my sole source of income and a thriving business that started with very little overhead. When people ask me how they can start their own at home Crochet Braids Business, I give them these key steps.

 

LICENSING

Find out the licensing requirements in your state.  In Virginia where I live, Braiders are not required to have a Cosmetology License. In fact, over the years, many states have deregulated their licensing requirements for Braiders.  But before you start, contact the Licensing Board in your state to make sure you have the latest information.

 

PRICING

Set your price point with your skill level and the demand in your area.  This is VERY IMPORTANT.  If you are a beginner, find out what the top braiders in your area are charging for Crochet Braids, then align yourself accordingly.  I have seen ranges anywhere from $65 to $250, depending on the city, cost of living and skill set. When I started out, there was virtually no one in my area that offered this service.  I practically had to convince folks to try it!  LOL.  I started at $75.  As I improved, my fee increased.

 

SERVICE

Providing a service means that you are catering to the needs of your clientele.  That is something I had to get used to because I was not formally trained in doing hair.  Make your service as convenient as possible for your clients.  In the first few years of my business, I provided a mobile service and I would go to my clients' homes. And although I'm no longer able to provide mobile service, I have found other ways to make my service convenient for my clients including:  providing the hair, accepting debit/credit cards, prepay options, video consultations, and online booking.  I make a habit of sending out Appointment Confirmations and Reminders when their appointment is approaching.  

 

 

MARKETING

There was a time when advertising a small business was expensive. But the internet has made marketing as simple as the click of a button.  Post clear pics of your work online.  Social Media is a hotbed for small business. Instead of business cards, try getting some postcards printed. And make sure the postcards include nice clear samples of your work.  Business cards are small and easy to lose.  Postcards are more visible and have better shelf-life.  Leave stacks of your postcards at your local beauty supply stores, grocery stores, laundry facilities and daycare locations....anywhere moms are likely to see them.  Checkout Vistaprint.com where you can design them yourself and order them online.  Once you're up and rolling, you can build a website.  But until then, make an account for yourself on a website like Styleseat.com, which is a directory service for stylists.

 

Sidenote:

People want to see your work and Crochet Braids are in high demand.  It costs next to nothing to post photos of your work online.  Whether its Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, Tumblr, Snapchat. etc.  Let people see CLEAR photos of your styles and please for the love of God....do not post pics of people covering their faces.  Use your own face if you have to, model your own work.  It is a distraction when people see your happy client with her face buried in her hands.  If she is in the witness protection program, then maybe modeling is not wise.  Surely you can find someone who wants to be seen and is proud of your work.  We all know at least 3 divas, LOL.   Ask your clients if they post selfies (and they likely do)...then have them tag your business page or website.  Ask them to give you credit  for the style when they post, or a simple shoutout will do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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